Steven Weng has been kind enough to allow me to use his pictures of this former Royal Danish Air Force F-104G (R-699) on my website. R-699 was tranferred to the RoCAF in 1988 where it became 4420.

Below are the cockpit shots.

General airframe pictures: click here

External details: click here

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

Steven Weng has been kind enough to allow me to use his pictures of this former Royal Danish Air Force F-104G (R-699) on my website. R-699 was tranferred to the RoCAF in 1988 where it became 4420.

Beow are the external detail pictures.

General airframe: click here

Cockpit pictures: click here

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

F-104G

On Target Profiles 1: Lockheed F-104 StarfighterJon FreemanModel Alliance GroupISBN 0-904643-00-0  The first of the On Target Profiles series book is about the F-104 Starfighter. It is a paperback book with 32 pages of colour profiles from all the countries that operated the F-104 Starfighter.The following aircraft are represented in this book:

Belgium:

  • F-104G, FX-1, natural metal, 1963.
  • F-104G, FX26, 350 Sqn, 1 Wing, natural metal, 1964.
  • F-104G, FX90, 31 Sqn, 10 Wing, SEA scheme, 1980.
  • F-104G, FX06, 31 Sqn, 10 Wing, SEA scheme, 1980.
  • TF-104G, FC03, 31 Sqn, 10 Wing, SEA scheme, 1980.
  • F-104G, FX-2, 350 Sqn, 1 Wing, natural metal, 1963.
  • F-104G, FX52, Tiger Meet, 1980s.

Comments: I am not sure the codes for the two early F-104Gs are correct. The picture I have of FX02 shows ‘FX02’ instead of ‘FX-2’ as shown in the profile. Also, although it shows a two-seater, the picture I have with the earliest national markings shows the red and black stripes in the fin flash to be wider than the yellow stripe. Apart from FC06 the codes seem to be incorrect, some in size and some in font. Although generally correct the colours for the Belgian version of the SEA scheme were slightly different than the standard US colours, something that is not mentioned in this book. 

Canada:

  • CF-104, 12797, 427 Sqn, natural metal, 1962.
  • CF-104, 104779, 421 Sqn, natural metal, 1972.
  • CF-104D, 104652, AETE, natural metal, 1970s.
  • CF-104, 104733, 1 CAG, overall dark green, 1970s.
  • CF-104, 104770, 4 Wing, dark green and dark grey camouflage, 1983.
  • CF-104, 104761, 4 Wing, dark green and dark grey camouflage, 1983.
  • CF-104, 421 Sqn, overall red special scheme, 1980s.
  • CF-104, 12761, 439 Sqn, Tiger Meet, 1981.

Comments: Generally the Canadian profiles suffer from disproportioned national markings and codes, the latter mostly being too small. The overall dark green CF-104 has a white rudder with five red maple leaves. All the pictures I have seen show only four maple leaves. This probably also means the red maple leaves would have been larger. The Canadian Tiger Meet aircraft from 1981 would have been 104761 instead of 12761 as all the CF-104s had been renumbered by this time. The CF-104 in the red special scheme also lacks some markings on the intakes. 

Denmark:

  • F-104G, R-346, ESK723, light grey, 1966.
  • F-104G, R-345, ESK723, dark green, 1980s.
  • F-104G, R-699, ESK723, light grey, 1960s.

Comments: The Danish profiles suffer from disproportioned national markings too, especially on the two light grey aircraft. The font used on all three profiles is also incorrect, and the tail fin should have had the serial number instead of the aircraft code. 

Norway:

  • RF-104G, FN-W, 331 Skvn, natural metal, 1964.
  • TF-104G, 469, 331 Skvn, light grey, 1970s.
  • CF-104, 870, 331 Skvn, dark green with light grey undersides, 1970s.

Comments: The natural metal F-104G looks accurate when compared to my reference pictures. On the other hand, the TF-104G is mentioned as being in the light grey scheme (the standard F-104 scheme with white upper wing surfaces), however, my reference pictures show this aircraft as being painted in the overall metallic grey scheme. Also, the anti-glare panel extends to the lower canopy frames. The CF-104 is called ‘CF-104G’, an incorrect designation as there never was such a type. Also, it is mentioned as being overall dark green but in reality the lower surfaces on the Norwegian CF-104s were metallic grey. 

Greece:

  • F-104G, FG-309, 335 Mira, natural metal, 1964.
  • RF-104G, FG-6693, 336 Mira, SEA scheme, 1980s.

 Comments: The two Greek profiles seem generally accurate, although I believe the blue colour on the national markings should be darker – at least on the one in the SEA scheme. 

Turkey:

  • F-104G, FG-623, 141 Filo, natural metal, 1965.
  • F-104G, 333, 161 Filo, SEA scheme, 1972.
  • F-104G, 6-093, 6 AJU, Marineflieger scheme, 1980s.
  • F-104G, 6-164, 8 AJU, overall light grey, 1980s.

Comments: The early natural metal aircraft looks accurate when compared to the pictures I have. The other three profiles also look accurate apart from the tail fin markings. The hyphen on 6-093 and 6-164 should have been placed higher. 

Germany:

  • F-104G, KF-134, natural metal, 1960.
  • F-104F, BB-361, Waffenschule 10, natural metal,1961.
  • F-104G, JA-124, JG 71, splinter scheme, 1965.
  • F-104G, VB-206, MFG 2, splinter scheme, 1964.
  • F-104G, 26-65, MFG 1, Marineflieger scheme, 1983.
  • F-104G, 21-24, JBG 36, splinter scheme, 1970s.
  • RF-104G, EA-235, AG 51, splinter scheme, 1966.
  • TF-104G, 29-19, Waffenschule 10, splinter scheme, 1960s.
  • F-104G, 20-50, JBG 31, splinter scheme, 1983.
  • F-104G, 26-67, MFG 2, Marineflieger scheme, 1986.
  • F-104G, 26-30, JBG 34, Norm 83 scheme, 1987.
  • F-104G, 24-54, WTD 61, Norm 83 scheme, 1985.
  • F-104G, 22-55, JBG 34, special scheme, 1987.
  • F-104G, 25-50, JBG 24, special scheme, 1984.
  • TF-104G, 28-31, JBG 31, overall blue special scheme, 1983.
  • F-104G, 20-36, JBG 32, special scheme, 1984.

Comments: The German profiles also suffer from disproportioned codes, and some also from slightly disproportioned national markings. 

Italy:

  • F-104G, 4-11, 9 Gr, 4 St, natural metal, 1965.
  • F-104G, 6-19, 154 Gr, 6 St, dark green and dark grey scheme, 1966.
  • F-104S, 4-21, 9 Gr, 4 St, dark green and dark grey scheme, 1989.
  • F-104S, 37-11, 18 Gr, 37 St, overall light grey, 1996.
  • TF-104G, 4-23, 20 Gr, 4 St, overall light grey, 1995.
  • F-104S, 5-30, 23 Gr, 5 St, dark green and dark grey scheme, 1988.
  • F-104G, 22 Gr, 51 St, special scheme, 1995.
  • F-104G, overall black special scheme, 2002.
  • F-104G, 28 Gr, 3 St, special scheme, 1989.
  • F-104G, 9 Gr, 4 St, overall red special scheme, 1989.
  • F-104S, 23 Gr, 5 St, special scheme, 2000.

Comments: Again the aircraft codes are a bit off, some being the wrong font while others have the wrong size. The first F-104G also shows too many stencils on the nose. I have been unable to locate a picture of a camouflaged F-104G with black codes so I am not sure whether it is correct. Apart from the aforementioned codes - and some of the stencils – the profiles look accurate, although they do not really show the special features of the S model (different main ventral fin etc.). The overall black F-104 is also listed as a G model but the real thing was an S model. 

Japan:

  • F-104J, 56-8672, 201 Hikotai, natural metal, 1970s.
  • F-104J, 46-8648, 204 Hikotai, natural metal and orange, 1970s.
  • F-104J, 46-8633, APW, natural metal, 1980s.
  • F-104J, 46-8600, APW, light grey, 1980s.
  • F-104DJ, 36-5014, 203 Hikotai, natural metal, 1970s.
  • F-104J, 56-8673, 203 Hikotai, natural metal and red and white, 1970s.

Comments: The Japanese F-104s seem to be generally accurate, although I have not been able to find pictures of the specific airframes. 

Jordan:

  • F-104A, 56-916, 9 Sqn, light grey, 1970s.

Comments: I have not been able to locate a picture of this specific airframe but from other pictures it is apparent that the flag on the tail fin is too small, and the green in the national markings is too light. Also, the aircraft would most likely have been natural metal or aluminium lacquer instead of grey.  

Pakistan:

  • F-104A, 56-804, 9 Sqn, natural metal, 1965.
  • F-104A, 56-879, 9 Sqn, natural metal, 1965.

Comments: These two profiles seem to be very accurate, although the white centre in the roundels might be a bit too large. The green colour is also too light but these are still minor point. 

Spain:

  • F-104G, 161-25, Esc 61, light grey, 1965-66.
  • F-104G, 104-12, Esc 104, light grey, 1965-72.
  • F-104G, 104-01, Esc 104, light grey, 1965-72.

Comments: The three Spanish F-104Gs are accurate when compared to my reference pictures. 

The Netherlands:

  • F-104G, KG-114, natural metal, 1963.
  • F-104G, D-6654, 322 Sqn, overall light grey, 1966.
  • F-104G, D-6654, 322, Sqn, dark green and dark grey, 1970s.
  • F-104G, D-8331, 312, Sqn, dark green and dark grey, 1983.
  • RF-104G, D-8107, 306, Sqn, dark green and dark grey, 1970s.
  • F-104G, D-8288, 322, Sqn, dark green and dark grey, 1970s.

Comments: The Dutch profiles are generally accurate. Only the stencils on the early version of D-6654 and the placement of the code on the later version of D-6654 do not appear as they do in my reference photos. 

Taiwan:

  • F-104A, 4204, 3/427 TFW, natural metal, 1969.
  • F-104G, 4356, 3/427 TFW, light grey, 1970s.
  • F-104G, 4414, 3/427 TFW, light grey, 1970s.
  • TF-104G, 4162, 2/499 TFW, SEA scheme, 1980s.
  • RF-104G, 4391, 5/401 TFW, two-colour compass ghost scheme, 1990s.
  • RF-104G, 4301, 7/421 TFW, two-colour compass ghost scheme, 1990s.

Comments: The Taiwanese F-104s suffer from the same disproportioned codes as some of the other profiles. In general the codes on the fuselage sides should all have the same size, and the codes on the tail fins should be the same size as the serial number on the fin. Also, 4414 is a former RDAF aircraft and was transferred to the RoCAF in the late 1980s so the time and the colour scheme given is incorrect. The correct colour scheme would be the two-colour compass ghost grey scheme. The code of the TF-104G is slightly too small, and the serial number on the fin is wrong, reading 7136 instead of 71316. The pictures I have of 4301 do not show the camera bulge on the belly. All profiles show the anti-glare panel as extending beyond the radome but this is not true for the grey F-104s from Taiwan. 

USA:

  • F-104C, FG-928, 479 TFW, natural metal with red stripes, 1964.
  • F-104A, FG-788, 83 FIS, natural metal, 1959.
  • F-104C, FG-891, 479 TFW, natural metal with red and white trim, 1958.
  • F-104A, 0-60827, 32 AD, light grey, 1962.
  • F-104C, 70928, 479 TFW, SEA scheme, 1966.
  • QF-104A, 60741, orange, 1970s.
  • F-104C, 60914, 479 TFW, SEA scheme, 1966.
  • F-104C, FG-901, 479 TFW, natural metal, 1960s.
  • F-104A, FG-779, SC ANG, natural metal, 1960.
  • F-104A, FG-764, AFFTC, natural metal with orange trim, 1960s.
  • F-104C, FG-922, 479 TFW, natural metal with green stripes, 1964.
  • F-104C, 60929, PR ANG, SEA scheme, 1967.
  • F-104G, 812, NASA, white and blue, 1980s.

Comments: The US F-104s are generally accurate, although the TAC badges are too small. The orange QF-104 would most likely have had the U.S. Air Force title in white instead of black. Also, the light blue on the NASA F-104 is way too bright. In general it seems that the most accurate profiles are the simply ones and the ones where the standard USAF Amarillo font has been used.

The proportions of the aircraft codes and the national markings are disproportioned on many of the profiles which is a shame.The book also contains a printed colour chart and a picture of the Model Alliance decal sheet for the F-104. The former can only be used as a very rough guide to the colours due to the fact that the colours are printed instead of being real paint. If the decal sheet is exactly as shown in the picture some of the errors in the profiles are repeated on the decals themselves. This is very noticeable on the Danish, Canadian and German markings.


Conclusion:
I cannot recommend this book as reference material due to its many small errors, however, as a source of inspiration it is a very good book. Just do not forget that it will require additional sources to build an accurate F-104.
 

These pictures show EH101 M-510 as it appeared on 20th February 2007. Notice that the IFR probe has been removed, and that a FLIR has been added.

Please respect the Copyright and do not repost my pictures anywhere or send them to anyone!

If you would like to use my pictures please contact me.

EH101 M-510

EH101 M-510

EH101 M-510